Course Descriptions

UNDERGRADUATE COURSE DESCRIPTIONS (A.A./B.A.) THEOLOGY/RELIGIOUS STUDIES

BI 100: Hermeneutics: Introduction to Bible Study

A study of the basic principles of hermeneutics and methods of Bible study. The course is designed to give the new student a solid foundation for the coming four years of intensive Bible study. The course presents the Bible as literature as well as the inspired Word of God with emphasis on the importance of textual and historical context in interpreting biblical passages.

BI 101: Old Testament Survey

This course provides an overview of the Old Testament, with a brief introduction to each of the 39 books, and a concise summary of their contents, enabling the learner to correctly relate the parts of the Old Testament to each other, and to the New Testament. The module allows the learners to enrich their knowledge of the Bible and their ability to read each part intelligently, with an understanding of the context in which each book occurs and of how doctrine evolved gradually over the centuries. Armed with this knowledge, students are able to develop their ability to relate the Bible and its contents to daily life and to Christian witness.

BI 102: New Testament Survey

This course provides an overview of the New Testament, with a brief introduction to each of the 27 books of the Protestant canon, and a concise summary of their contents, enabling the learner to correctly relate the parts of the New Testament to each other, and to the Old Testament. The module allows the learners to enrich their knowledge of the Bible and their ability to read each part intelligently, with an understanding of the context in which each book occurs and of how doctrine evolved gradually over the centuries. Armed with this knowledge students are able to develop their ability to relate the Bible and its contents to daily life and to Christian witness.

BI 103: The Pentateuch

The foundation for the revelation of God and his dealings with man throughout the Old and New Testaments are found in the Pentateuch or Five Books of Moses. In these books we see the unity and authority of the Bible which always points forward to the Savior.

BI 109: The Book of Matthew

This course is based upon the Gospel of Matthew. Matthew, a former despised tax collector, penned the gospel that bears his name. He addressed the deteriorating state of the church and set out to bring correction to disillusioned, wayward and overconfident believers. Matthew left his readers a true meaning of: righteousness of the gospel, the standard of discipleship, the reason for the Lord’s delay in returning. This message is applicable for the church in every generation in all lands.

BI 201: The Gospel of John

The fourth Gospel is studied in light of its historical context and its stated evangelistic purpose to discover its testimony of the deity of the Lord Jesus Christ and to his saving work. The course will also explain and demonstrate some basic interpretative principles and methods of Bible study.

BI 202: The Book of Acts

A detailed study of the origin and development of the apostolic church and of the ministry of the ascended Christ as carried on through the church by the power of the Holy Spirit.

BI 203: Pauline Epistles: Romans

An intensive study of the book of Romans and Galatians (for personal devotional purposes) in the light of the principles of sound exposition and analysis.

BI 205: Interpreting Signs and Symbols

The majority of the symbols and types, and the principles of interpretation, are presented in this course with a view towards present meaning.

BI 220: Corinthians

An analysis and exposition of each book stressing the historical background and doctrinal matters with special emphasis on the Holy Spirit as treated by Paul in I and II Corinthians.

BI 223: Ephesians

An analysis and exposition of this dynamic letter of Paul the apostle to the church in Ephesus, expand the horizons of his readers, so that they might understand better the dimensions of God’s eternal purpose and grace and come to appreciate the high goals God has for the church.

BI 302: Major and Minor Prophets of the Old Testament

The ministry of the prophet and the gift and function of prophecy is explained from a historical and modern context. The place and environment of prophetic ministry, prophetic presbytery, and the office of the prophet is explained.

BI 400: Advanced Hermeneutics

This course is an advanced study in hermeneutics and interpretation theory from pre-modern times to the present, with a focus on the interpretation and method of reading biblical texts. The course is designed to prepare the student for advanced interpretation of scripture and will investigate biblical interpretation in light of current theological, philosophical, ecclesiological, historical and social challenges. The student will be exposed to current scholarship on a variety of hermeneutical topics. The student will learn to be humble and open-minded when approaching the text, even those that seem familiar. A scholarly approach will be presented. 3 Credit Hours. Prerequisite: None

BI 405: Authenticity & Authority of the Bible

This course explores the manuscript and archaeological evidence supporting and detracting from the reliability of the text of the Bible as an original ancient manuscript. The origins of the biblical texts, the establishment of the canon, and issues of higher criticism will be explored. The course also introduces the student to unique perspectives concerning the authority of the Bible and its application in church and community life. 3 Credit Hours. Prerequisite: None

HUMAN BEHAVIOR

CC 101: Sociology of Marriage and Family Life

This course provides a careful examination of the modern problems inherent in marital and family relationships; offers suggestions for treatment on an individual and church-wide basis; and provides numerous counseling resources.

CC 201: Introduction to Psychology: Christian Counseling Perspectives

This course proposes to help the student discover the basic concepts of Christian counseling and increase skill and competence in counseling situations.

CC 218: Marriage and Family II: Parenting on Purpose from a Christian Perspective

A careful examination of the modern problems inherent in marital and family relationships, with special emphasis on parenting and its importance in church life.

CC 301: Self-Concept:

Studies in Biblical Inner Healing This course contains the biblical bases for the concept of inner healing and healing of the memories. The student will be able to deal with issues in his or her own past that may be preventing them from being a “real person.”

CC 303: Assessment in Christian Counseling

This course is the examination of emotional problems, their antecedents and consequences with a special emphasis on the destructiveness of sin. The course will look at different methods of assessing psychological problems.

CC 304: Developing a Counseling Ministry This course is intended to help the Christian develop a counseling ministry. It presents the various laws and ethical requirements related to counseling and studies the many forms needed to conduct a successful counseling ministry.

CC 305: Human Sexuality

This is an introductory course dealing with the subject of human sexuality. The student will learn about what the Bible teaches about acceptable sex in the life of the Christian. Sexual deviations will also be considered.

CC 402: Crisis Counseling: A Christian Perspective

The world we live in, because of the influence of sin, is filled with problems. When crises happen, whether by “accident” or design, they cause severe disruption to our lives. It is an inherent quality of ministry to be able to effectively minister to those in crisis times. 3 Credit Hours. Prerequisite: None

CC 404: Counseling the Dysfunctional Family

This course deals with the subject of dysfunctional families, especially as related to the psychological and spiritual dynamics of generational patterns. Attention is given to the need for understanding the theological and psychological patterns of reconciliation. Particular attention is given to showing the importance of relationship between the Father Image and its influence on generational patterns in the family. 3 Credit Hours. Prerequisite: None

CC 405: Addiction Counseling

Exploration of the significant issues in chemical dependency is the core of this course. Counseling the poly-abuse client on an inpatient and outpatient basis with special emphasis on 12-step models will be studied. 3 Credit Hours. Prerequisite: None

CC 406: Counseling and Family Violence

Counseling and Family Violence from a Christian perspective is one of the required courses for students pursuing a degree in counseling with an emphasis in family counseling, domestic violence counseling, substance abuse and addiction counseling and/or pastoral counseling, Counseling and Family Violence focuses on the etiology, context, methodology and effects of domestic violence within the family. This course is designed to acquaint students, pastors, chaplains, educators and church workers with the psychological, sociological and theological aspects of family violence and abuse in its many forms. The underlying purposes of the course are to: (1) provide students an understanding of the biopsychosocial antecedents to family abuse and violence; (2) to provide students an understanding of the cycle of violence and the behavioral patterns associated with each phase of the cycle; (3) to educate students in the various forms of abuse that can escalate to violence; (4) to provide students an understanding of the nature of both expressive and instrumental violence; (5) to teach students how to conduct an assessment and psychosocial evaluation of a domestic violence perpetrator (batterer) and victim (battered spouse); (6) to train students in effective therapeutic intervention techniques, and; (7) to increase students critical thinking, writing skills and report preparation. 3 Credit Hours. Prerequisite: None

CC 415: Human Development

This course is an introduction to human development from the perspective of physical, emotional, intellectual and social development. This course offers a broad overview of perspectives, principles, theories, and research findings associated with the field of human life-span development. The aim of the course is to provide a foundation of knowledge that will help the student become a more effective counselor, educator, and leader. 3 Credit Hours. Prerequisite: None

PRACTICUM

PC 100: Practicum: Servanthood The focus of this course is to provide a rewarding learning experience for the Bible College student at a beginning level. The focus of this practical ministry experience is servanthood.

PC 200: Practicum: Stewards in God’s House The focus of this course is to provide a rewarding learning experience for the Bible College student at an intermediate level. The focus of this practical ministry experience is stewards in God’s house.

PC 300: Practicum: Practical Ministry The focus of this course is to provide a rewarding learning experience for the Bible College student at an advanced level. The focus of this practical ministry experience is practical leadership ministry.

PROPHETIC

CI 101: New Testament Prophetic Ministry

Personal prophecy and the prophetic ministry are by no means new to the Church. We find personal prophecy all the way back in the Garden of Eden (Gen. 2:23, 24), and the ministry of the prophet stretching from Genesis to Revelation (Gen. 2, Rev. 11:10). In fact, the Bible is literally saturated with examples of these two subjects. Amazingly enough, in spite of their high profile, there is relatively little written on these subjects from a modern day, practical perspective. Dr. Hamons book “Prophets and Personal Prophecy” makes a major contribution in this regard.

CI 102: Purpose & Destiny of the Church

A panoramic view of the Church from its foundation and looking ahead to the future. The movements, experiences and demonstration that have contributed to restoring the Church back to its original doctrines are studied. This course discusses why God has a Church; His purpose and plan for His Church; why the Church has not fulfilled the great commission and what is necessary to do so.

CI 201: The Day of Saints

This study gives an explanation of the “Saint’s Movement”, why it is happening today, and how each believer has a place and responsibility to fulfill this move of God. The course provides an overview and better understanding of God’s Kingdom principles for both our individual lives and the marketplace.

CI 202: The Gift of the Spirit

This course gives the student a deeper understanding of the purpose and operation of the nine gifts of the Holy Spirit in the New Testament Church today. Some of the issues to be explored are: the validity of the baptism of the Holy Spirit and glossolalia as for today, the relationship between the gifts of the Spirit and the fruit of the Spirit, motivation and proper representation of the Holy Spirit, ownership vs. stewardship of the gifts, ministration of the gifts, etc. The Bible is the main textbook combined with the course text and supplemental text.

CI 301: Prophetic Protocols and Ministry Principles

This course discusses the character of the prophetic minister and addresses some of the pitfalls and principles that will hinder or enhance the prophetic flow and the effectiveness of their ministry. Students are shown how to recognize hidden “root” problems, and detect and correct character flaws and “weed seed” attitudes. The author’s use of the 10 M’s of ministry helps identify those who are “true” or “false” prophets.

GENERAL EDUCATION

GE 103: English Composition

A study of the principles of composition with emphasis on language, the mechanics of writing, the types of discourse, and research and documentation. The course develops students’ ability to write unified, well-developed and coherent expository essays that employ standard English usage and mechanics, and exposes the students to literary works that sharpen their critical-thinking and analytical skills necessary in college writing. The course also includes a study of rhetoric and short-essay composition, and readings and responsive writing assignments. This is predominantly a skills course to develop the student’s writing competency as a foundation for all future studies.

GE 112: Introduction to Management

This course introduces the subject of management, identifies leadership positions, and stresses the importance of the role of leadership and management skills in Christian Ministry. Biblical principles of leading like a servant and shepherd and qualifications for leaders are also discussed. Major tasks of leaders are reviewed, with emphasis on decision-making and handling conflicts. Guidelines for training leaders and followers are given, and principles of success and reasons for failure examined. Emphasis is placed on the context of Management in Community Service, preparing the student to support Community Leadership.

GE 201: Cultural Anthropology: A Christian Perspective

Students will examine cultural anthropology from a Christian perspective, with particular emphasis on environmental analysis for missions. The students will gain a deeper understanding of different approaches to cultural anthropology and the applications of cultural theory for understanding cultural and religious diversity in the modern world. The importance of applied cultural anthropology to address the challenges of cross-cultural living and ministry will be emphasized.

GE 220: Financial Integrity and Stewardship

This course is designed to prepare students to maintain integrity in Christian Ministry when dealing with finances and issues of stewardship. The course includes spiritual and financial blockades to financial integrity, proper use and distribution of personal and ministry funds, budgeting, ethical fundraising, financial responsibility and accountability, and matters of finance pertaining to the local church.

EDUCATION

ED 101: Dynamics of Teaching

This course is designed to familiarize the student with the principles of teaching in a structured environment. Emphasis is placed upon the principles of organization and presentation methodology including, Stating Objectives, Lesson Planning, Evaluation, Curriculum Selection and Development, Teaching Illiterate Students, and Teacher Training.

ED 401: Philosophy of Christian Education

A study will be made of theological concepts that form the philosophical perspectives and principles of Christian education. Organization and administration of church educational programs so as to integrate them within the total ministry of the local church is a primary focus of this course. This course includes a study of the major religious and secular developments in history and education along with a comparison of those developments with biblical principles. The goal is to develop an understanding of the church role in education and to develop a personal philosophy of Christian education. 3 Credit Hours. Prerequisite: None

ED 432: Classroom Management

This course emphasizes practical, classroom-tested techniques and strategies. Well-organized and managed classrooms set the stage for student learning and achievement. Students will explore a range of models and strategies that will serve as a foundation for developing a personal approach to classroom management. Classroom management will be defined by exploring theory and research in the field. In addition, rationale will be examined in considering it as a system, as instruction, and as discipline. 3 Credit Hours. Prerequisite: None

LEADERSHIP

OL 440: Conflict Management and Resolution

This course examines causes of dysfunctional anger and conflict, and provides biblically consistent principles and methods for management and prevention. The course provides for both acquisition of knowledge and development of interpersonal skills. 3 Credit Hours. Prerequisite: None

OL 460: Ethics in Leadership

Leadership Ethics highlights the importance of fidelity, integrity, and value-based decision making. Contemporary ethical issues in church, community, and ministry leadership are examined from a biblical perspective. This course explores the sources, methods, disputes and insights of Christian ethics. Central themes and issues include freedom, conscience and the passions, the relation of God and morality, love and justice, virtue and law, and the question whether there is a distinctive Christian ethics. Because Christian ethics is a form of reflection which arises out of moral conflict, the course utilizes specific moral problems as a way of exploring these themes. Ultimately, these explorations will provide the student with a theoretical basis for understanding the nature of moral thinking itself and the form which it takes within a Christian context. 3 Credit Hours. Prerequisite: None

BUSINESS

CI 420: Biblical Foundations of Business

This course is a prerequisite for all other business courses

This course presents six biblically based keys to marketplace success and lays a scriptural foundation as to the importance of implementation of those keys by every marketplace Christian, not only into their place of business but also in their individual lives. These six keys to business success are essential for every Christian to be able to fulfill their purpose and call in the place where God has positioned them whether it be in the home, in business, in some professional field, or in the market square. The topics included are: Workmanship; Stewardship; Servanthood; Values; Ethics and Integrity; Hearing the Voice of God; and Developing a Vision. 3 Credit Hour

CI 422: Business Management from a Biblical Worldview

This course will bring an understanding of some of the key characteristics of relationships; especially in the marketplace, the dynamics of the Relationship Cycle and how it operates. Learn the nine principles of focusing on God and His Kingdom and examine how to manage that which God controls. Learn to submit to His ultimate control over your business and understand God’s perspective on them. Learn to understand how God uses circumstances to direct career paths. Understand the value God puts on people and how much He cares about developing the man so much more than ideas, things or money. Develop an understanding of the Scriptural meanings of servant along with four principles of servant leadership. Examine five functions of a manager operating as a steward. Learn how to understand conflict, how to hear the Voice of God in it, allowing Him to reveal answers to conflict problems. Recognize early warning signs in order to prevent deeper conflict. 3 Credit Hours.

CI 424: Principles of Transformation in the Workplace

Learn how to successfully bring Christ into the work place, without adversely affecting your work habits, and offending employers and employees. Achieve an understanding of true mentoring and the process it entails. Learn the answers to nine questions answered in an economic system through a study of economics from a Biblical perspective. Understand free enterprise capitalism and how it works and learn about profiles and characteristics of a successful entrepreneur. Learn to understand the content of a market feasibility study; how to lay out a plan of action or vision for success in your specific field of expertise. Gain understanding in the intricacies of your calling and what God expects of you as a Marketplace Minister. Understand the Biblical perspective of excellence and success versus the world’s view of success. Understand the character qualities of a man with whom God is pleased; learn to use these examples in becoming a mature Christian with biblically based character traits. Understand the definitions of ethics, Biblical ethics and moral judgments and learn four tools which can be used in analyzing moral judgments. 3 Credit Hours.

CI 426: Communication and Spiritually in the Workplace

God created us to hear His voice and He desires to communicate with us regarding chosen fields of expertise. Learn to understand God’s methods of communication and the importance of communication with God. Learn techniques on active listening, what interferes with the communication process and how to be heard. Achieve a new level of communication by understanding to enhance the communication process. Learn and understand the operating principles of how the Kingdom of God works and the nature of the Kingdom of God. Understand God’s perspective and the Biblical principles of work. Learn to recognize the major issues confronting marketplace ministers. Understand the importance of a Christian worldview and how a Christian World View directs our life in the workplace. Learn how to understand the nature of burnout and stress and how to avoid becoming burned out along with remedies that can be utilized in relieving burnout. 3 Credit Hours.

CI 428: Marketing for Business and Ministry

Learn the nature of the marketing process through basic elements of marketing and steps in the marketing process. Understand the “Four P’s” applied to both business and nonprofit marketing techniques. Develop an understanding of utilizing marketing skills and tools in order to finance and raise funds for both non-profit organizations and secular business. 3 Credit Hours.

RELIGIOUS STUDIES

RS 101: Dynamic Christian Foundations

This foundational course explores detail the fundamental foundations of Christian belief. Orthodox Christian truths will be taught in detail and are a prerequisite for a dynamic Christian life.

RS 102: Christian Life

Paul stated that whenever possible we are to live our lives at peace, especially within the household of faith. In our day, we need to learn the pattern for gracious living.

RS 103: Introduction to Communication: Evangelism Perspectives

The core of this course is practical training in the philosophy and methods of soul winning, visitation, discipleship follow-up and evangelistic outreach including signs and wonders.

RS 105: Theology of Worship

Thanksgiving, praise, and worship are vital for the New Testament Christian. Worship is dynamically illustrated and taught in this course. Emphasis on Who we worship and why is maintained throughout.

RS 106: Principles and Power of Prayer

This course shows the vital contribution of prayer in developing the whole person mentally, physically, and spiritually. A study is made of both Old Testament and New Testament prayer life, with special emphasis on the prayer life of Jesus and the early church. This approach helps the student to realize how prayer becomes a resident creative force in Christian living.

RS 109: Spiritual Formation: Journey to Wholeness

This course examines the biblical perspectives on God’s plans and purposes for man and how God through his love and grace helps man to develop a believer’s personality through stages of spiritual development.

RS 110: Spiritual Warfare

As a child of God we must understand that our Heavenly Father is GOOD. His chief motivation in our life is to make us the best person we can possibly be. On the other hand, Satan is totally evil. Jesus gives us Satan’s job description in John 10:10. This course is about the battle of Good against evil.

RS 111: Kingdom Living

This course deals with the concepts of living by the laws and principles of the Kingdom of God.

RS 121: Fruit of the Spirit

This course is a study on the Fruit of the Holy Spirit. How much fruit do you want in your life? Is your love for God reflected in your love for others? Has your love for God led to self-control? This course defines and discusses the fruit of the Spirit and urges you to permit the Holy Spirit to transform your character to become progressively more like Christ. The Holy Spirit is the creator of the Church and the fruit of the spirit is the ‘glue’ that holds it together.

RS 122: New Creation Living

This course is intended to help the student to know and understand who they are in Christ. The Scriptures say that believers are created in the image of Christ.

RS 200: History of Civilization I: Church History Perspectives

A study of church history during the Apostolic Age, the ante-Nicene period, and the post-Nicene period. Topics include the rise of orthodoxy, the many transformations that took place after the conversion of Constantine, the rise of the papacy, the many forms of medieval religious life, and the emergence of new forms of both lay and clerical piety. The developmental history of Western Civilization, in relation to the History of the Church, is noted in particular.

RS 201: Authority of the Believer

This course is designed to equip the student to understand and operate under the authority given to us by Christ. The student will learn from scripture the nature of Christ’s provision for us and our authority under His Lordship to function as Kings and priests.

RS 202: Cults and the Occult

The course will focus upon several modern cults. We will study the historical aspects of the beginning of each cult, their basic doctrinal positions, and their position relative to Biblical Christian beliefs. While not primarily a course designed for witnessing your faith, the course will aid the student in future contact with cult members and those influenced by cult members.

RS 203: Soteriology

The Doctrine of Salvation is clearly delineated and expanded in this course. Questions regarding the process of salvation, its importance, etc. will be covered.

RS 205: Healing Covenant

The healing ministry of the church has essentially been given over to health care professionals. This course will explore issues such as historical, Biblical foundations, emotional, spiritual, and physical aspects of healing. The goal of this course is to recover this vital ministry in the church.

RS 209: Faith Dynamics

Living a life of victory, power, and sufficiency requires faith in our Lord Jesus Christ. This course discusses in detail the dynamics of faith and their relationship to the believer.

RS 210: The Blood Covenant

The covenant of God to his people has always been sealed with blood. The course of this covenant between God and his people is demonstrated throughout the Word of God.

RS 212: Speech and Communication: Homiletics

This course is on the fundamental methods of sermon preparation. It emphasizes both structure and delivery. Attention is given to the determination of audience type, the proper use of voice, and other principles of public speaking.

RS 217: Introduction to Charismatic Theology

This course explores the fundamental foundation of Christian belief in the area of the gifts of the Holy Spirit. Orthodox Christian truths will be taught in detail and are prerequisite for a dynamic Christian.

RS 219: Christian Character Development

This course examines the biblical perspectives on Christian Character and how God through his love and grace helps man to develop a right Christian character and personality through clearly established Biblical processes.

RS 248: Angelology

A thorough study of the role and function of angels in relation to the church of Jesus Christ and the believer is detailed in this course.

RS 249: Demonology

A thorough study of the role and function of angels and demons in relation to the church of Jesus Christ and believers is detailed in this course.

RS 250: Faith Dynamics II:

Mountain Movers Living a life of victory, power and sufficiency requires faith in our Lord Jesus Christ. This course discusses in detail the dynamics of mountain moving faith and their relationship to the believer.

RS 301: Pastoral Ministry

This is a study of the practical side of a minister’s life and duties. It will include instruction in the proper manner of services, and a discussion of many of the problems a pastor faces.

RS 304: Introduction to Leadership

A detailed study of the basic principle of leadership as it applies to the local church. This will include the Dynamics of Leadership, Qualifications of Leadership, Counseling and Ethics, Church Administration and Government, etc.

RS 305: Introduction to World Missions

A study of the theology of missions, history of missions from Pentecost to the present, and culture and the missionary, with special emphasis on the unreached people groups of the world.

RS 307: Finding God’s Will

Finding one’s place in the body of Christ as well as direction for one’s life and ministry is essential for effective Christian service. There are many theories of Divine guidance and each are explained within a solid Biblical perspective.

RS 314: Principles and Philosophy of Church Growth

The Great Commission of Jesus Christ (Matthew 28:18-20) is the continuing mandate of the church. Though methods of evangelism and church planting have changed, the mandate remains the same. How to “grow the church” is the focus of this course.

RS 349: Royal Priesthood

This course presents studies on the priesthood of the believer. It is intended to help the believer to “come boldly to the throne.” The course examines the functions, responsibilities and blessings of being a priest in the Body of Christ.

RS 350: Dynamics of Revival

This is not so much a course on the techniques of planning a revival meeting, as it is a course in the true dynamic of true revival that comes from the Lord.

RS 403: Women’s Roles in the 21st Century Church: A Christian Perspective

This course will explore the interdisciplinary study of the changing identity and roles of women in the family, church, society, and ministry from history, psychology, philosophy, sociology, and theology. The course explores other ministries available that are relevant in today’s Christian community.

RS 405: History of Women in Ministry

An in-depth study of daughters of the church from the New Testament times to the present. This course endeavors to survey history and insight regarding women’s significant ministries in variety of ways throughout the history of the church.

RS 407: Women of Excellence in Home and Ministry

A course intended to help women in Christian Leadership with a ministerial career. It addresses the issues and special concerns with helpful teaching guides, the process of prioritizing ministry and family life in modern society and church.

RS 419: Systematic Theology

The course will introduce students to the study of theology using the method known as systematic theology. While, by and large, the faculty of Vision International University reject the validity of a rational attempt to systematize biblical reflection or to dogmatize the experience of the scriptures, this course will serve as general exposure to systematic methodology from a Renewal Theology perspective. This course will not be a survey of the content of systematic theology but rather will introduce the students to the major issues in the forefront of the discipline in the Pentecostal and Charismatic traditions. The course utilizes the reflective approach rather than a dogmatic approach. The course will establish foundational principles and definitions that will guide theological discussion. The student will engage the primary text to inform and elicit theological thinking. The student will engage theology proper, the doctrine of God, from a Renewal perspective, and probe the nature of God, basic Christian doctrine, Renewal distinctives, and theological anthropology. 3 Credit Hours. Prerequisite: None

RS 435: Christian Theology

In the church we use words that are often not clearly understood by the new Christian or by the unchurched. In this course the student will study the meaning of each theological word and will be able to apply these words to their own life. An introduction to the basic teachings of the Christian faith, this course includes discussions of the nature and task of theology and of the Christian understanding of God, revelation, creation, spirituality, sin, and redemption. 3 Credit Hours. Prerequisite: None

RS 436: Ecclesiology

An examination of the New Testament church with particular concern given to its origin, distinctive nature, mission, government, offices, ordinances, and destiny. The course will explore the nature and development of the Christian church and its interaction with contemporary society. The emphasis of the course will be practical ministry and church structure. Biblical exposition and church tradition will be jointly examined. Critical thinking about the church, clergy, parishioners, and society will be stressed. 3 Credit Hours. Prerequisite: None

RS 437: Christology

This course examines and analyzes the development of the doctrine of Christ from a biblical-expositional perspective. The course provides a detailed and contemporary theological study of the person of Christ. Special attention will be given to the Christological controversies of the early Christian centuries, and the resolutions of the councils that dealt with those controversies. The student will develop a personal Christology rooted in scripture and tradition. 3 Credit Hours. Prerequisite: None

RS 438: Eschatology

A review of the classical concepts of Christian Eschatology and of various contemporary approaches to the same material. Issues concerning the Return of Christ and the Apocalypse will be explored from a hermeneutical perspective. An interpretive study of the biblical passages concerning the final things according to scripture and Christian tradition. Consideration will be given to various views of the return of Christ, the resurrection of the dead, the final judgment, and the eternal state. Students will be presented with the array of diversity, from the futurist to the preterist views. 3 Credit Hours. Prerequisite: None

RS 439: Pneumatology (The Holy Spirit)

This course provides a simple presentation regarding Holy Spirit Baptism from a classical Pentecostal/Charismatic perspective. It establishes that every Christian experiences Holy Spirit Baptism, the new birth and the baptism in the Spirit are distinct, and that the miraculous gifts of the Spirit are still available and should be occurring in the worship of today’s church. The course affirms that while glossolalia is the general biblical pattern for Holy Spirit baptism, it is not defensible dogma to assume that it is the only pattern that God uses. 3 Credit Hours. Prerequisite: None

RS 440: The Challenge of Leadership

The focus of this course is the development of developing a sound biblical perspective in the challenge leaders face. Principles of both secular and spiritual leadership will be explained in depth. Leaders from government, business, education, and religion are analyzed for their positive strengths, leadership qualities, and ability to overcome adversity. The course is case study driven and provides real-world examples of leadership principles for the student to apply to her/his immediate context. 3 Credit Hours. Prerequisite: None

RS 441: Strategic Church Administration

When spiritual leaders are asked about their least desirable ministerial activities, administration is usually at the bottom of the list. A main reason cited for this antipathy for administration is that few leaders feel adequately equipped for this onerous task. Strategic planning, staffing, and management are explored in ways that those serving in ministry can understand and appropriate. Practical application will be emphasized. 3 Credit Hours. Prerequisite: None

RS 442: Church Growth and Development

A study of church growth and development with special emphasis on church health. Attention will be given to the skills of observation of the historical and contemporary roles of the church and society. Students will describe the socialization and dynamics of the church to culture, and develop skills for effective ministry. Common errors in church leadership and development will be explored. Leadership in the church and administration of church affairs are explored in detail. Methods of administration and forms of leadership style and responsibility are delineated 3 Credit Hours. . Prerequisite: None

RS 444: Advanced Christian Worldview Studies

In almost every field, apologists recognize that “proof” will convince people only when they are already disposed to believe. The deepest human need is emotional, not rational; human hearts must be stirred before our intellects will respond. Thus the “proofs” of God in the end are valuable mostly as adjuncts to the witness of scripture. For that reason, many people, whose faith is already simple, untroubled, and firm, find no use for these proofs. But others are not so fortunate, and for them the proofs are an encouragement to faith, and a stiller of doubts. This course contrasts the Biblical concept of apologetics with various alternative positions, both theistic and non-theistic. This course will insist upon an intellectually humble and reasonable approach to apologetics, opposing the bombastic certainty espoused by some approaches to apologetics. This course will propose an apologetic that accounts for the inadequacies of arguing faith-dependent issues in rationalistic or empirical terms. This course is designed to refine the student’s Christian worldview to engage a humbled perspective of science, religion, culture, and human existence. This course also considers major problem areas such as authority, miracles, evil and evolution and sets forth a basis for Christian apologetic which is theologically and historically sound. 3 Credit Hours. Prerequisite: None

RS445: Women’s Effective Ministries

Advanced course of various concepts on how to develop a woman’s effective ministry in your church or community. It develops techniques on how to start, build, implement, maintain and expand ministry that will meet the needs of today’s women.

RS 447: Discipling the Ex-Offender

This course examines the causes of recidivism and answers the question – Why do they go back? The course discusses topics including: Preparation of inmates through pre-release programs, the first 30 days, and long-term aftercare requirements. 3 Credit Hours. Prerequisite: None

RS 448: Ministry in Correctional Institutions

An intensive survey designed to provide a basis for study of, and sharpening of skills for ministry in the jail and prison setting. An overview of the types of facilities in which ministry takes place, types of ministry being carried out, and opportunities for ministry within the facility and post-facility setting. 3 Credit Hours. Prerequisite: None

RS 449: Ministry in Juvenile Correctional Settings

This course is an in-depth study of correctional ministry to juveniles as it relates to understanding troubled youth, influences which lead to juvenile delinquency, skills and qualifications of those who minister, and working within the limitations of the Juvenile Justice System. 3 Credit Hours. Prerequisite: None

RS 451: Worship Leading

This course is a study of the purpose and function of leading worship and how it involves the roles of the pastor, worship leader and worship team in the worship service. We will examine how to properly prepare for a worship service through effective preparations and how to lead in a small and large group. In addition we will seek to understand different expressions in Christian worship and its relationship to the presence of God. 3 Credit Hours. Prerequisite: None

RS 452: Quest for God

The Worship Team plays a vital role in helping people come into the presence of God. Every worship team member has great potential for ministry. It is unfortunate, however, that many worship team members never realize their potential… never develop their gift to be in the presence of God. The purpose of this course is to teach the worship team member how to enter into God’s presence as well as how to lead others into God’s presence.3 Credit Hours. Prerequisite: None

RS 453: Biblical Theology of Worship

The purpose of this course is a study of the biblical theology and historical foundations of worship, especially as it is expressed in the contemporary worship and the renewal movement. Focus will be on worship’s purpose, priority, personification, and portrayal. The study will be conducted by discovering worship’s definition, history and renewal in the context of contemporary worship trends. 3 Credit Hours. Prerequisite: None

RS 454: Theology of Music: A Christian Perspective

The purpose of this course is a study of the theology of music; its importance and purpose. Focus will be on the real meaning and purpose of music from a biblical perspective. The study will be conducted by discovering kingdom music’s role and power in prophecy, praise and worship and revival. We will further discover the relationship of music to the (S) spirit world. This course teaches the basics of music in the kingdom of God. 3 Credit Hours. Prerequisite: None

RS 462: Future Worship

This course is a study of worship in the future and how a changing world can enter God’s presence in the new millennium. The study will examine models of worship in the church’s changing culture and how God wants worshippers to worship Him. 3 Credit Hours. Prerequisite: None

PROPHETIC

CI 410: Theology and Practice of Spiritual Gifts –

Presented in seminar format -This course is a prerequisite for all other prophetic emphasis courses

Strong emphasis is placed on training leaders to activate the saints in the gifts of the Holy Spirit with which they have been endowed (I Cor. 12 & 14). Teaching is also provided on the gifts themselves and related subjects. A combination of lecture and experiential learning is employed, with mature, seasoned ministers teaching, guiding and instructing the students. For seminar dates and locations please call us at 1-888-360-0004 or check on-line at www.christianbibleinstitute.net. 3 Credit Hours.

CI 412: Theology and Practice of Prophetic Ministry (Introduction) – Presented in seminar format

Be trained and activated and gain a deeper understanding of prophetic principles. Learn how to activate the prophetic ministry by breaking the power of fear, understanding prophetic protocols and dealing with character flaws and root problems. Prerequisite: CI410. For seminar dates and locations please call us at 1-888-360-0004 or check on-line at www.christianbibleinstitute.net. 3 Credit Hours.

CI 414: Theology and Practice of Prophetic Ministry (Intermediate) – Presented in seminar format

This course addresses questions such as: Does God like/desire to talk to His people? Can you set a time and place to prophesy? Learn about the principles of Spiritual Gift stewardship. Be trained and activated to a greater flow in prophecy, word of knowledge and the word of wisdom. This course focuses on training those who are called to Apostolic Prophetic ministry. Prerequisite: CI410 For seminar locations and dates, please call us at 1-888-360-0004 or check on-line at www.christianbibleinstitute.net. 3 Credit Hours.

CI 416: Theology and Practice of Prophetic Ministry (Advanced) – Presented in seminar format

Advance training to tap into a deeper, more mature, more accurate flow of prophetic ministry. Be activated in ministering present-truth through the heart of God. Learn how to handle contradictions and pitfalls of prophetic ministry. Prerequisite: CI410. For seminar dates and locations please call us at 1-888-360-0004 or check on-line at www.christianbibleinstitute.net. 3 Credit Hours.

CI 418: Advanced Practice of Spiritual Gifts Seminar –

Presented in seminar format

Advanced training in student’s specific area of interest. A list of choices is available by contacting us at 1-888-360-0004 or by checking on-line at www.christianbibleinstitute.net. 3 Credit Hours.

GRADUATE COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

THEOLOGY/RELIGIOUS STUDIES

CH 505: Survey of Church History

Church history is the heart of His story, God’s kingdom work on earth. This course explores the development of the Christian church from Pentecost to the present day. It covers key people and events that God used throughout history to bolster His church and also those negative influences that infected her. The goal of the course is to use lessons from church history to advance the kingdom of God in life and ministry. (This course serves as a synthesized combination of ITS courses CH506 The History of the Church to the Reformation and CH507 The History of the Church Since the Reformation.) 3 Credit Hours. Prerequisite: None

CH 506: The History of the Church to the Reformation

This course is designed to provide the student with a basic introduction to the development of the Christian church’s doctrine, faith and practice from its founding at Pentecost to the time of the Protestant Reformation. 3 Credit Hours. Prerequisite: None

CH 507: The History of the Church Since the Reformation

This course is designed to provide the student with a basic introduction to the development of the Christian church since the time of the Protestant Reformation. 3 Credit Hours. Prerequisite: None

CH 510: A History of the Charismatic Movements

Charismatic theology is more than just a theology of spiritual gifts; worship, Bibliology, sanctification, and ecclesiology are also central. Learners will complete an historical and theological study of the origins and developments of Classical Pentecostalism, Charismatic Renewalism, and Restoration Movements, with emphasis given to theological backgrounds and trends. Lectures also analyze other related movements, including the “Jesus Only” Movement, the Vineyard Movement, and the Toronto Revival Movement. Throughout the course, the pros and cons of the various charismatic movements are presented so that students can make informed decisions on what a “victorious Christian life” entails. 3 Credit Hours. Prerequisite: None

MT 501: Spiritual Formation

An investigation into the meaning of biblical Christianity and it relationship to faith and practice within contemporary cultural contexts. Special attention is given to the corporate dimensions of spirituality and spiritual formation as defined in the New Testament. Those historical and cultural factors which have led to the privatization of Christianity are analyzed and discussed. A paradigm of spiritual growth and maturity which focuses on the assembly rather than the individual is developed. 3 Credit Hours. . Prerequisite: None

MT 502: The Role of Women in Ministry

A study of ministry to and by women, including biblical foundations for roles of women in the home, church, and society, and principles for evangelizing, discipling, and counseling women. The course is designed to aid men and women who will be responsible for various areas of women’s ministries. 3 Credit Hours. Prerequisite: None

MT 504: Evangelism in the Local Church

Christ’s final charge was the Great Commission: to “make disciples of all nations.” We fulfill that charge when we take the Gospel to the nations and to our own nation through our own local church. In this course, Dr. Green instructs us on how to do evangelism within a local church setting. Building on the biblical mandate for evangelism, he discusses personal and group methods for evangelism in a variety of settings, how to equip laity to witness, the use of apologetics, follow-up methods, and current issues in evangelism. Throughout the course, Dr. Green focuses on practical application and workable solutions for evangelism in local church and parachurch ministries. 3 Credit Hours. Prerequisite: None

NT 501: The Sermon on the Mount

This course is an expository and reading study of the Sermon on the Mount with emphasis on the practical and spiritual application and upon the theological issues and various interpretations therein. 3 Credit Hours. Prerequisite: None

NT 502: The Pastoral Epistles

Perhaps the greatest need in the Christian community today is Biblical leadership. Throughout the world, churches struggle with numerous issues because they lack relevant and effective leadership. A good leader possesses godly character, sound doctrine, and Biblical priorities. Yet today, there are differing views on several issues related to leadership, such as: What are the responsibilities and priorities of ministerial leaders and their work? Who is qualified for pastoral leadership? Can women serve as pastors? What should pastors expect in ministry?

This course identifies Biblical answers to crucial leadership questions from three of Paul’s letters, 1 and 2 Timothy and Titus, which primarily address issues of pastoral leadership and ministry. In his twenty lectures, Dr. John Stott walks his listeners through an exegetical analysis of Paul’s words to Timothy and Titus. He shares valuable insight from the historical background and an investigation of the Greek New Testament. Dr. Stott covers such topics as how a congregation should appoint leaders, the role of women in the ministry, the primary function of a minister’s work, and how to deal with false teachers while remaining true to “sound doctrine.” 3 Credit Hours. Prerequisite: None

NT 504: NT Survey: The Gospels/Life of Christ

The most compelling and important story in history is the story of Christ. In this course, learners complete a chronological and synthetic study of the Gospels’ accounts of Christ’s birth, life, death, resurrection, and ascension. The course focuses on the time, place, circumstances, and people involved in the events of our Lord’s ministry. From the Incarnation to the Ascension, students will grasp a fuller understanding of Christ’s words and works, especially in light of Old Testament prophecy and cultural context. The goal of the course is that Christ will impact learners’ lives as He did those first generation followers, leading them to worship and serve Him as they minister to others. 3 Credit Hours. Prerequisite: None

NT 508: The Epistles and Revelation

Correct theology is inseparable from correct living. The New Testament epistles reinforce this concept as they demonstrate both the why and how of Kingdom living. This course surveys the New Testament epistles and the Book of Revelation, examining both the introductory issues and the basic content each book. Students will wrestle with significant and challenging passages by exploring the major issues and then interacting with specific passages through inductive Bible study. The goal of the course is to gain an increased commitment to and capacity for applying these portions of God’s Word to the world and Christian living today. 3 Credit Hours. Prerequisite: None

NT 509: Fundamentals of New Testament Greek

This course presents an introduction to the basic features of grammar and vocabulary of New Testament Greek, and utilizes the textbook by William Mounce, Basics of Biblical Greek: Grammar (Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 1993). 3 Credit Hours. . Prerequisite: None

NT 511: The Christian and New Testament Theology

The purpose of this course is to introduce the student to the discipline and task of New Testament theology as a subset of biblical theology and to enable the student to take steps toward formulating his/her biblical theology of the New Testament. 3 Credit Hours. Prerequisite: None

OT 505: The Book of Psalms

How important are songs in the life of Israel and the Church! In this course learners study the Book of Psalms, giving attention to the various forms of the Psalms and their function within the historical experience of Israel. The course begins by focusing on the formulation and interpretation of the psalms. Students then examine in detail the various types of psalms: lament, royal, pilgrimage, wisdom, messianic, and psalms of descriptive praise. Dr. Waltke gives sermonic treatment of selected psalms with application for today’s Church. 3 Credit Hours. Prerequisite: None

OT 506: Understanding the Old Testament

This course surveys the history of salvation in the Old Testament, especially as it relates to the universal of the Old Testament theology which is the rule of God: the establishment of His Kingdom upon the earth. 3 Credit Hours. Prerequisite: None

OT 509: The Christian & Old Testament Theology

The Old Testament may be the central problem of theology. The problem is this: How do the people of God today relate to the people and teaching of the Old Testament, and how do they apply that teaching to life and ministry? While wrestling with this issue we must ask other important questions, such as, “How does the Old Testament relate to the New?” or “What is the main purpose of the Old Testament?” Stated practically, “What principles of the Old Testament should I be actively obeying?”

This course considers such important questions by examining the foundational theology of the Old Testament as applied to the New Testament and the Church. The course identifies the focal point for the Old and New Testaments, and includes discussions on continuity and discontinuity between the Testaments, saving faith, the people of God, law, worship, atonement, the Kingdom of God, the Messiah, the inclusion of the Gentiles, and the New Covenant. Throughout the course, Dr. Kaiser shows how Old Testament theology is vital to contemporary Christian living. 3 Credit Hours. Prerequisite: None

PT 501: Christian Ethics

An examination of the theories of obligation and theories of value from a philosophical perspective. A biblical theology of obligation and a biblical theology of value are presented along with their implications for decision-making in personal life and church life. 3 Credit Hours. Prerequisite: None

PT 504: Christian Worldview

How do you view reality? What is the source of your knowledge? Do you live what you believe? Such are the questions that a worldview answers. This course examines the nature and function of belief structures, and the value of developing and living a distinctly Christian life. The course develops a Christian worldview from a redemptive history model of Biblical theology, which is then clarified using the philosophical categories of metaphysics, epistemology, and axiology. Learners will gain an understanding of modern and postmodern thought and how to critique them biblically, and are encouraged to develop and apply a Christian worldview to life and ministry. 3 Credit Hours. Prerequisite: None

ST 503: Contemporary Theology I

For good or for bad, philosophy has played a pivotal role in the development of theology and culture. In this course, learners examine the major trends in contemporary theological thought in light of their philosophical contexts. The course begins with a review of the major developments in Western thought prior to Hegel, and then explores the theologies of Hegel, Kierkegaard, Barth, Bultmann, and Tillich. The course culminates in the “Death of God” theologies of Paul Van Buren and Thomas Altizer. The course enables learners to evaluate contemporary, non-evangelical theologies and to recognize their impact on everyday life. 3 Credit Hours. Prerequisite: None

ST 504: The Doctrines of Man and Sin

This lecture series is designed as a critical and historical overview of views regarding the nature of mankind, both as the image of God and as a being corrupted by sin. The course presents both a distinctive Reformed anthropology and a fair treatment of differing views and objections, evidence for both sides being carefully weighed. 3 Credit Hours. Prerequisite: None

ST 505: The Doctrine of Salvation

This lecture series is designed as a critical and historical overview of the plan and order of salvation, tracing each movement of the process from our regeneration to our final glorification. The course material provides both a reformed theology of salvation and a fair treatment of differing views and objections, evidence for both sides being carefully weighed. 3 Credit Hours. Prerequisite: None

ST 506: The Doctrine of the Trinity

This course presents the historic, classic and orthodox doctrine of the Holy Trinity. It follows a biblical, historical and dogmatic approach. It seeks to show how and why the classical doctrine/dogma emerged in the fourth century; what have been the major ways this dogma has been understood; and how crucial is this teaching for a right understanding of the relation of God to man and of man to God. 3 Credit Hours. Prerequisite: None

ST 507: Contemporary Theology II

In this course we continue to examine some of the major trends in contemporary theology. Discussion focuses on theologies prevalent especially since the 1960s. Theologies covered are Theology of Hope, Liberation Theology, the Feminist Theology of Elizabeth Johnson, Process Theology, New Age Theology, and four forms of Postmodern Theology. 3 Credit Hours. Prerequisite: None

WM 501: Introduction to World Missions

God has one unified, global purpose for all He does. This course introduces the exciting biblical, historical, cultural, and strategic dimensions of His plan. It addresses key issues: the basis of and necessity for world missions, and the status of and plan for world missions. Students are introduced to the basics they need to pursue missionary training or to help lead their local church in its global ministry. 3 Credit Hours. Prerequisite: None

WM 502: The History of Missions

This course traces the historic development of the Christian world mission in chronological sequence from Pentecost to William Carey (1793). The modern period is developed along geographical lines: Asia, Middle East, Africa, Latin America, and Europe. The course closes with an attempt to evaluate the achievements of the past and the prospects of the future. 3 Credit Hours. Prerequisite: None

WM 503: Urban Mission and Ministry

This course focuses on Christian mission and ministry in the world’s growing cities. A Biblical basis for urban ministry is presented and case studies of effective urban strategies worldwide are examined. The course provides key logistics, strategies, models, and insights from one of the day’s leading experts in urban missions. Throughout the lessons the instructor emphasizes holistic ministry, i.e., meeting the social, civil, and political needs as well as the spiritual. 3 Credit Hours. . Prerequisite: None

EDUCATION/ADMINISTRATION

CE 501: Church Administration and Leadership

A course designed to develop leadership potential in students and to give them a familiarity with the various elements of the administrative process, including: goal setting and achieving, organization, delegation, human relations, group dynamics, supervision, and the training of other leaders. Though the principles are universal, the focus of the course is the local church. 3 Credit Hours. Prerequisite: None

CE 502: Interpersonal Communication and Conflict Management

An examination of the process of interpersonal communication and conflict management in human relationships within Christian organizations, with attention given to communication models, self-concept, nonverbal messages, stress and other strategies that will assist the Christian leader in developing interpersonal communication skills and the productive use of conflict. 3 Credit Hours. Prerequisite: CE501 or CO 500

CE 503: Advanced Leadership and Administration

A church leader wears many hats. In this course learners discover how to maximize productivity in the various functions of church leadership. The course examines the biblical foundation and practical functions of administrative leadership in churches and Christian organizations, and focuses on developing successful, biblical attitudes and skills among team leaders. Students will analyze basic leadership principles from secular and evangelical sources, analyzing them through a biblical/theological grid. (This advanced course is built on ITS course CE 501 Church Leadership and Administration. However, CE 501 is not a prerequisite for this course.) 3 Credit Hours. Prerequisite: CE502

CE 504: Adult Ministries in the Church

Students review the principles of andragogy and its application to various adult age levels and special adult groups such as singles, single parents, and families. Students will analyze and synthesize the church’s entire ministry to adults. 3 Credit Hours. Prerequisite: CE503

CE 505: Effective Administrative Leadership

The purpose of this course is to assist in the training of Christian administrative leaders. A helpful balance has been produced in this course with an emphasis on both the biblical information concerning leadership as well as the practical, day-to-day information needed for successful leadership. The goal of this study is for the student to obtain a fresh understanding of the practical application of biblical leadership principles in his/her ministry setting. 3 Credit Hours. Prerequisite: CE504 or LE504

ED 500: Philosophy of Christian Education

This course includes a study of the major religious and secular developments in history and education along with a comparison of those developments with biblical principles. The goal is to develop an understanding of the church’s role in education and to develop a personal philosophy of Christian education. The course also teaches introductory concepts related to education in the local church and Christian school contexts. 3 Credit Hours. Prerequisite: None

ED 600: Primary Christian Education

This course reviews development of infants and children in several dimensions; cognitive, emotional, social, and religious. Parental, family, church, and institutional-agency ministry reviewed with the purpose of encouraging students to develop a starting theology of ministry to persons in this age group and to practice skills fundamental to such ministry. 3 Credit Hours. Prerequisite: ED500

ED 620: Secondary Christian Education

This course reviews development of teenagers and young adults in several dimensions: cognitive, emotional, social, and spiritual. Parental, family, church, and institutional-agency ministry critically reviewed with the purpose of encouraging students to develop a starting theology of ministry to persons in this age group and to practice skills fundamental to such ministry. 3 Credit Hours. Prerequisite: None

ED 650: Curriculum Development in Christian Education

This course includes a study of the principles and aims of curriculum development, with an emphasis on selection and creative use of curriculum materials and resources to fulfill the educational task of the church. Students will be presented with various views on the means of knowing God and differing views of Scripture, as well as how each of these views influences development and choice of curriculum. Students will be introduced to the inductive Bible study method, as well as a method of lesson planning known as the HBLT approach. Students will be led through a consideration of how both of these methods can be adapted to teach different age students, including adults, youth, children, and preschoolers. Students will be presented with Maslow’s and Herzberg’s research on individual needs, along with an instrument for assessing learners needs in a classroom setting. Bloom’s Taxonomy will be used to motivate a consideration of the aims of a Bible lesson and the methods available to creative Bible teachers. Students will be exposed to common practices of truly great teachers, factors that motivate learning, and a method for evaluating the teaching-learning process. Throughout the course, students will be encouraged to see the learner as an individual who, depending on age and experience, is motivated in different ways to achieve unique ends. 3 Credit Hours. Prerequisite: None

ED 750: Teaching Methodology

This course is designed as an introduction to basic methods for teaching from a dynamic biblical viewpoint. The purpose of the course is to assist the theology students in understanding the essential elements of effective instruction and learning. Students will be introduced to different genres of writing in the Bible, as well as appropriate methods of interpreting each genre. For any given biblical passage to be taught, students will be encouraged to consider the big idea that needs to be conveyed to students, how to bridge the gap between the world of the Bible and the student’s world, and problems that might be encountered at the planning and presentation levels for the lesson. Students will be challenged to think about how their own teaching can be improved in terms of fostering active learning, motivating learning, communicating clearly, personalizing biblical truth, and building a constructive classroom atmosphere. Students will be guided through the process of choosing a lesson topic and theme, leading students to discover the thematic and structural unity of the biblical passage through the method of inductive Bible study, and evaluating the results of instruction and learning. 3 Credit Hours. Prerequisite: ED650

HUMAN BEHAVIOR

CO 500: Psychology and Theology

This study is intended to help pastors and other Christian leaders develop proficiency in enabling people to solve their problems while understanding and balancing the tensions between psychology and theology. 3 Credit Hours. Prerequisite: None

CO 510: Human Development

It is the purpose of this course to focus on the anatomical, physiological, intellectual, sociological and spiritual development of the human organism from conception until death. The major theorists in the area of human development will be researched and the various major theories of human development will be critically compared. Specifically, this course views human growth and development as a psychological, biological, and spiritual process that demands an integrated analysis. The course addresses the development and wellness of individuals and families throughout the life cycle. The aspects of development including biological, social, cognitive, emotional, and moral will be covered. The course will examine how the abilities, needs, problems, and concerns of humans change throughout life, and how people are shaped by their experiences throughout their development. 3 Credit Hours. Prerequisite: None

CO 530: Counseling Theories and Strategies

This course will introduce students to counseling psychology concepts and interventions related to lifespan development, prevention of mental health problems, social justice, and optimal human functioning in both the church and society. An emphasis will be placed on psychopathology, in order to provide strategic counseling for specific issues in the congregation and family. The course provides preparation in the core counseling skills essential for the practical counseling and effective treatment outcomes. 3 Credit Hours. . Prerequisite: None

CO 540: Crisis Counseling

Crisis Counseling is one of the required courses for students pursuing degrees in counseling with an emphasis in family counseling, domestic violence counseling, pastoral counseling and substance abuse and addiction counseling. Crisis counseling focuses on the etiology, context, process and effects of victimization. This course is designed to acquaint students, as well as pastors, chaplains, educators, and church workers understand the theoretical basis for, and acquire the practical skills necessary to carry out effective therapeutic interventions in a diversity of crisis situations. Emphasis is given those types of crises typically encountered by the Christian Counselor including: 1) Grief and Bereavement, 2) Emotional Traumatization, 3) Sexual Molestation and Incest, Domestic Violence and The Abuse of Children and Elders. The underlying purposes of the course are to: 1) provide students an understanding of the nature, effects and consequences of crises, to perpetrator, the victim and witnesses as well as society in general, 2) educate students in the types of trauma inducing crises 3) teach students the signs and symptoms of unresolved trauma, resulting in Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and manifesting itself in numerous associated personality disorders, thereby enabling students to identify victims of trauma, traumatized witnesses and their abusers, 4) teach students how to conduct an assessment and psychosocial evaluation of a traumatized individual, 5) teach students how and when to use direct and indirect counseling techniques, 6) how to develop appropriate social service networks and guide clients to hotlines, victim support groups and other support services that can assist them in regaining control of their lives, 7) train students in effective therapeutic intervention techniques including stress-reduction, and 7) increase students critical thinking, writing skills and report preparation. 3 Credit Hours. Prerequisite: None

CO 550: Marriage and Family Counseling

This course is designed to expand on the basic concepts and procedures for marriage and family counseling from a pastoral perspective. The purpose of the course is to assist theology students in their development of a ministry to family systems. The course provides a comprehensive understanding of various approaches to marital and family therapy. Within the context of systems theory, emphasis will be placed on understanding various methods of conceptualizing family dynamics and intervention strategies. 3 Credit Hours. Prerequisite: None

CO 560: Assessment and Diagnosis

This course provides an understanding of individual and group approaches to assessment and evaluation in counseling. There will be an emphasis on assessment strategies and psychometrics. The phenomenology of emotional disorders and their diagnosis will be explored in detail. The course will also explore the means of assessment and diagnosis that are consistent with effective counseling techniques. 3 Credit Hours. Prerequisite: None

CO 610: Group Dynamics

Group Dynamics: A Christian Perspective, is one of the required courses for students pursuing a degree in counseling. This course explores the history of the development and growth of groups (an outgrowth of social psychology), the varied kinds of groups, and the process and structure of individual and group behavior as it relates to group dynamics, Christian maturity and ministry. The course will acquaint students, pastors, chaplains, educators, church workers and group facilitators with the theory and research relating to small and large groups; the benefits and detriments of homogeneous groups vs. gender-specific, or problem-specific groups; and the benefits and detriments of democratically governed groups vs., facilitator directed groups. Students will gain insight into a number of different types of groups, including: problem solving groups, decision making groups, recovery groups, support groups, process groups and Christian Growth Groups. Students will learn how to develop, organize and govern groups to optimize the effectiveness of group dynamics for behavioral change and cognitive restructuring. 3 Credit Hours. Prerequisite: None

CO 620: Addiction Counseling

The course is one of the required courses for students pursuing degrees in counseling. It is designed to acquaint these students, as well as pastors, chaplains, educators, church workers with the etiology, cultural context, prevailing patterns and outcomes of alcohol and drug abuse, the phenomenon of addiction as an illness of body, mind and spirit, and the resources, treatment approaches, models and methods for helping alcoholics and addicts in their recovery. Particular focus in given to the medical aspects of illnesses and recovery in addiction. The underlying purposes of the course are to: 1) provide students an understanding of the nature and consequences of substance abuse, to the individual abuser as well as society, 2) educate students in the drugs of abuse 3) teach students the signs and symptoms of substance abuse, thereby enabling them to identify substance abusers, 4) teach students how to conduct an assessment and psychosocial evaluation of a substance abuser, 5) teach students how to select the most appropriate treatment approach, setting and modality, 6) train students in effective therapeutic intervention techniques, and 7) increase students critical thinking, writing skills and report preparation. 3 Credit Hours. . Prerequisite: CO610

CO 630: Cross-Cultural Counseling

This course provides an overview of the theories of multicultural counseling and development from a culture-centered perspective. Issues related to social and cultural diversity will be examined as well as guidelines for developing multicultural counseling competencies and sensitivity in counseling service. The impact of diversity, within and between group differences, is examined. Various psychosocial developmental factors of diverse cultural and ethnic groups, and the influence of these variables on the counseling relationship will be explored. 3 Credit Hours. Prerequisite: CO620

CO 640: Ethics and Law

This course provides an introduction to professional ethics with special application for the Christian Counselor. The course includes an analysis of professional ethics, training and practice standards, educational requirements, and mental health law. Attention will be given to contemporary professional and psycho-social issues that effect the training and practice of Christian counselors. The course also provides students with the knowledge of legal and ethical guidelines for the practice of community and religious counseling. Students will learn to use these guidelines to make sound decisions about professional practice. The course examines ethical and legal standards related to professional practice and the impact of personal values on the counseling process. 3 Credit Hours. Prerequisite: CO630

CO 680: Pastoral Care of the Elderly

This course provides an overview of issues, problems, and challenges that older individuals face so that those involved in pastoral care are able to recognize and respond to the needs of the aging population. Physical, cognitive, emotional, and psychological changes in the over 65 age group will be reviewed to assist the pastoral care giver in understanding issues of dependence, security, affiliation, loss, and mental health in light of elderly persons’ spiritual needs. 3 Credit Hours. Prerequisite: None

CO 710: Human Sexuality

In an atmosphere designed to de-mythologize sexuality, this course examines different sexual styles, behaviors, cultural values, and over-reaction to sexual stimuli. Resources from Biblical theology and the behavioral sciences are utilized as each student is asked to develop a stance about sexuality of modern times for an effective spiritual ministry. 3 Credit Hours. Prerequisite: None

LEADERSHIP

LE 501: Introduction to Leadership and Leaders

This is a study of the nature of leadership. It will introduce a practical definition of what leadership is, briefly consider the recent history of leadership research, reflect on changing paradigms in Christian leadership today, and study the differences between leadership and management. Particular focus is given to the nature of transformational leadership. The underlying purposes of the course are to: (1) provide students with an understanding of the nature of leadership and leaders, (2) lead the students in personal evaluations of their own roles as leaders and managers, (3) guide the students in making personal plans for their improvement as leaders, (4) give students a clear conceptual framework within which to understand the differences between leadership and management, along with the practical implications of those differences, and (5) increase students’ critical thinking, writing skills, and report preparation. 3 Credit Hours. Prerequisite: None

LE 502: Ministry Leadership Foundations

This course is one of the required courses for students pursuing degrees in leadership. It is designed to acquaint these students, as well as pastors, chaplains, educators, and church workers with a model of healthy Christian leadership as well as a clear understanding of both servant and abusive leadership. Particular focus is given to the centrality of Christ in Christian leadership. The underlying purposes of the course are to: (1) provide students with an understanding of a healthy Christian leader and servant leadership, (2) lead the students in personal evaluations of their own lives and ministries, (3) guide the students in making personal plans for leadership improvement, (4) provide students with an understanding of the characteristics of abusive leaders, (5) lead the students in personal evaluations of their own strengths and weaknesses as leaders, (6) guide the students in making personal plans for avoiding being abusive leaders, and (7) increase students’ critical thinking, writing skills and report preparation. 3 Credit Hours. Prerequisite: None

LE 503: Dynamics of Effective Leaders and Followers

This course is one of the required courses for students pursuing degrees in leadership. It is designed to acquaint these students, as well as pastors, chaplains, educators, and church workers with basic models of effective leadership and followership from a biblical perspective. Particular focus is given to the practices of effective leaders and effective followers. The underlying purposes of the course are to: (1) provide students with an understanding of the practices of effective leaders, (2) lead the students in personal evaluations of their own leadership practices, (3) guide the students in making personal plans for leadership improvement, (4) provide students with an understanding of the characteristics of healthy followers, (5) lead the students in personal evaluations of their own strengths and weaknesses as followers, (6) guide the students in making personal plans for followership improvement, (7) provide students with a comprehensive understanding of the causes and prevention of leadership derailment, and (8) increase students critical thinking, writing skills, and report preparation. 3 Credit Hours. Prerequisite: LE502

LE 504: Spirituality and Leadership

This course is the most important one in the leadership degree program. It is designed to acquaint students, as well as pastors, chaplains, educators, and church workers with a clear biblical understanding of the core role of true spirituality in Christian leadership. Particular focus is given to union with Christ as the heart of healthy Christian leadership. The underlying purposes of the course are to: (1) provide students with an understanding of true spirituality in Christian leadership, (2) lead the students in personal evaluations of their own spiritual lives and motives for ministry, (3) guide the students in making personal plans for improvement in their spiritual lives, and (4) increase students critical thinking, writing skills, and report preparation. 3 Credit Hours. Prerequisite: LE503

LE 505: Contemporary Issues in Leadership

This course is one of the required courses for students pursuing degrees in leadership. It is designed to acquaint these students, as well as pastors, chaplains, educators, and church workers with an understanding of several key contemporary issues in leadership: teams, change, organizational improvisation, multiculturalism, and women in leadership. The underlying purposes of the course are to: (1) provide students with an understanding of these contemporary issues, (2) lead the students in personal evaluations of their own leadership practices, (3) guide the students in making personal plans for leadership improvement, and (4) increase students’ critical thinking, writing skills and report preparation. 3 Credit Hours. Prerequisite: LE504

LE 506: Leader Development

This course is one of the required courses for students pursuing degrees in leadership. It is designed to acquaint these students, as well as pastors, chaplains, educators, and church workers with a biblical and practical model of effective leader development. Particular focus is given to the 18 principles of how leaders are built. The underlying purposes of the course are to: (1) provide students with an understanding of how leaders are built, (2) lead the students in personal evaluations of their own leadership development, (3) guide the students in making personal plans for building other leaders, (4) guide the students in making personal plans for their improvement as leaders, and (5) increase students’ critical thinking, writing skills, and report preparation. 3 Credit Hours. Prerequisite: LE505

LE 511: Leadership Practicum

This course is one of the required courses for students pursuing degrees in leadership. This course consists of a collage of practical learning experiences, dealing with the student’s spiritual and character development in the context of relationships with others, on an ongoing basis throughout the degree program. It is designed to implement much of the content of the other courses in the lives of these students, pastors, chaplains, educators, and church workers. Particular focus is given to create a context for life change in all the demands of healthy leadership. The underlying purposes of the course are to: (1) lead the students in the development of their own spiritual lives, (2) lead the students in the development of their own relational lives in both areas of church and family life, (3) lead the students in the development of their own lives and ministries in the area of calling, and (4) increase students’ capacity to take theoretical information and use it in a practical way to facilitate life change for themselves and others. 3 Credit Hours. Prerequisite: None

CC 840: Clinical Applications of Counseling in the Church

This is an independent study project, with a focus on understanding the dynamics of clinical applications of counseling in the Church. 5 Credit Hours. Prerequisite: None

CC 850: Psychopathology, Sin and Demonic Influence

This is an independent study project, with a focus on understanding the dynamics of psychopathology, sin and demonic influence. 5 Credit Hours. Prerequisite: None

CC 860: Psychotherapy, Pastoral Counseling and Inner Healing

This is an independent study project, with a focus on understanding the dynamics of psychotherapy, pastoral counseling and inner healing. 5 Credit Hours. Prerequisite: None

CC 870: Psychology and Theology: A Personal Integration

This is an independent study project, with a focus on understanding the dynamics of psychology and theology. 5 Credit Hours. Prerequisite: None

CC 880: Personality Theory, Therapy: A Christian Worldview

This is an independent study project, with a focus on understanding personality theory and therapy. 5 Credit Hours. Prerequisite: None

DM 800: Leadership in Pastoral Care

This is an independent study project, with a focus on understanding the dynamics of leadership in pastoral care. 5 Credit Hours. Prerequisite: None

DM 801: Church Growth and Leadership

This is an independent study project, with a focus on understanding the dynamics of church growth and leadership. 5 Credit Hours. Prerequisite: None

DM 802: Cross Cultural Perspectives in Pastoral Leadership

This is an independent study project, with a focus on understanding the dynamics of cross cultural perspectives in pastoral leadership. 5 Credit Hours. Prerequisite: None

DM 803: Counseling, Family Life and Pastoral Leadership

This is an independent study project, with a focus on understanding the dynamics of counseling, family life and pastoral leadership. 5 Credit Hours. Prerequisite: None

DM 804: The Media, Leadership, and the Church

This is an independent study project, with a focus on understanding the dynamics of the media, leadership and the church. 5 Credit Hours. Prerequisite: None

DM 805: Spiritual Development of the Pastor, Church and Community

This is an independent study project, with a focus on understanding the dynamics of spiritual development of the pastor, church and community. 5 Credit Hours. Prerequisite: None

DM 806: Ethics and the Church in Today’s Culture – Pastoral Perspective

This is an independent study project, with a focus on understanding the dynamics of ethics and the church in today’s culture. 5 Credit Hours. Prerequisite: None

DM 807: Conflict Management and Resolution in Church Life

This is an independent study project, with a focus on understanding the dynamics of conflict management and resolution in church life. 5 Credit Hours. Prerequisite: None

DM 809: Women in Ministry: The Controversy Over the Ordination of Women

This is an independent study project, with a focus on understanding the dynamics of the controversy over ordination of women. 5 Credit Hours. Prerequisite: None

DM 810: Leadership Principles Applied to Pastoral Ministry and Church Extension

This is an independent study project, with a focus on leadership principles applied to pastoral ministry and church extension. 5 Credit Hours. Prerequisite: None

DM 811: Missions in the 21st Century

This is an independent study project, with a focus on understanding the dynamics of missions in the 21st century. 5 Credit Hours. Prerequisite: None

DM 812: The New Apostolic Reformation: Paradigms and Procedures

This is an independent study project, with a focus on understanding the dynamics of the new apostolic reformation. 5 Credit Hours. Prerequisite: None

DM 813: Psychology or Theology: Conflicting or Contemporary?

This is an independent study project, with a focus on understanding the dynamics of psychology and theology. 5 Credit Hours. Prerequisite: None

DM 814: Contemporary Theology and Evangelical Belief

This is an independent study project, with a focus on understanding the dynamics of contemporary theology and evangelical belief. 5 Credit Hours. Prerequisite: None

DM 816: Renewal Ministry from a Historical Church Perspective

This is an independent study project, with a focus on understanding the dynamics of renewal ministry from a historical church perspective. 5 Credit Hours. Prerequisite: None

DM 817: Revival and Church Planting

This is an independent study project, with a focus on understanding the dynamics of revival and church planting. 5 Credit Hours. Prerequisite: None

DM 818: Preaching: Its Place and Importance in Contemporary Worship

This is an independent study project, with a focus on understanding the dynamics of preaching. 5 Credit Hours. Prerequisite: None

DM 899: Doctoral Project (10 credits)

Registration in this course entitles the student to the services related to the doctoral project. The student will prepare, and submit for approval, a proposal for a project. This proposal will follow the style and format outlined in Research Writing Made Easy. Upon completion and approval of a proposal the student may proceed to the writing and completing the project. 5 Credit Hours. Prerequisite: None

ED 810: Conflict Resolution in Educational Leadership

This is an independent study project, with a focus on understanding conflict resolution in educational leadership. 5 Credit Hours. Prerequisite: None

ED 820: Human Behavior and Management in Education

This is an independent study project, with a focus on understanding human behavior and management in education. 5 Credit Hours. Prerequisite: None

ED 830: Psychology of Learning in Education

This is an independent study project, with a focus on understanding psychology of learning in education. 5 Credit Hours. Prerequisite: None

ED 840: Philosophy of Educational Leadership

This is an independent study project, with a focus on understanding philosophy of educational leadership. 5 Credit Hours. Prerequisite: None

ED 850: Educational Leadership for Private School and Church

This is an independent study project, with a focus on understanding educational leadership for private school and church. 5 Credit Hours. Prerequisite: None